Why Do You Get a Sore Vagina After Sex?

Why Do You Get a Sore Vagina After Sex

Why Do You Get a Sore Vagina After Sex?

There are a variety of reasons why sex may be painful—and, fortunately, a variety of methods to alleviate the discomfort.

 

 

After experiencing a painful vagina after sex, it’s quite normal to have a lot of concerns and concerns are understandable. If an intense romp leaves you waddling (let’s be honest, it’s the most realistic and very unsexy way to describe it), it’s tempting to think that things have gotten a little out of hand a little too quickly. Many individuals like rough sex that produces some degree of pain in certain situations. However, in the majority of cases, your vagina should not ache after sex—or even during intercourse.

 

 

After all, getting intimate with your spouse should be a pleasurable experience. Consequently, if you’re experiencing discomfort during sex (which is medically referred to as dyspareunia1, by the way), it’s critical that you communicate this to both your spouse and your doctor. This should not lead you to believe that there is anything fundamentally wrong with you or with your body. You shouldn’t be under the impression that you simply have to put up with it. 

 

Experts were called in by SELF to discuss the possible reasons of vaginal or pelvic pain after sex, as well as what you may do to alleviate the discomfort.

 

 

First , is it ever natural to feel painful after having sex?

Please understand that sex is not meant to be painful (and we’re not talking about consensual pain during sex—we’re referring to the type of sex that hurts when you don’t want it to) and should not be uncomfortable.

In the opinion of Mary Jane Minkin, M.D.2, a clinical professor of obstetrics and gynecology and reproductive sciences at Yale Medical School, “it is not typical to feel painful after intercourse unless it is [your] first time, and there was some stretching of the hymen to deal with.” This is the tissue that surrounds the entrance of your vaginal canal3. Many people’s hymens thin or rip as a result of ageing.

 

 

However, just because it is not usual to feel painful after sex does not rule out the possibility that it may occur. After all, almost three in every four women will experience pain during sex at some time in their life, according to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG)4. Pain may be a transitory problem for some individuals, but it can also be a long-lasting problem for others.

 

 

What causes a painful vagina after a sex session.

 

If you recall nothing else from this essay, keep this in mind: if sexual contact is causing you discomfort, speak with your doctor. Find out why this is happening with your doctor, since sex should be pleasant, enjoyable, and pain-free for both of you. (Do not push yourself to accept anything less than the best!)

 

However, although this article is an excellent beginning point for understanding what may be going on, it should never be used in lieu of an open and honest discussion with a professional. Keeping this in mind, read on to find out more about the most frequent causes of pelvic discomfort or a painful vagina after sex, including:

 

First and foremost, there was insufficient lubrication for intercourse.

Inadequate lubrication is one of the most frequent causes of discomfort during or after sexual encounters, which may result in a painful vaginal surface. (Make a mental note of this since it’s going to come up many times.) Everyone generates a varied quantity of natural lubrication, and there are many reasons for this, including age, birth control, and certain medicines, to mention a few.

 

When your vagina isn’t adequately lubricated during sex, the friction may create small rips in your skin, which can be embarrassing. After sex, these tears may leave you more susceptible to infection, and they can also cause your vaginal pain to worsen.

How to make yourself feel better right now: Idries Abdur-Rahman, M.D.5, an ob-gyn at Vista Physician Group, advises placing a little amount of lubricant in your vagina—even after sex—to keep your vagina moist and comfortable. 

 

He compares it to applying lotion on your skin when it’s especially dry; it’s never too late to moisturize your skin, and it may really have a calming impact on your skin, according to him. It goes without saying that any lubricant that contains alcohol should be avoided at all costs. To ensure that your efforts to comfort do not wind up hurting the tears in your skin, carefully examine the substances listed on the label.

 

 

Making sure you’re using enough quantities of lubricant is the first step in preventing future discomfort.. You may use this to augment your natural lubrication as you see fit, and it is a simple procedure. From there, you’ll want to consult with your gynecologist, who will be able to advise you on your best course of action.

 

 

2. There was a deficiency in arousal before to intercourse.

Sometimes you’re simply not in the mood for anything, and that’s perfectly OK. The lack of enough lubrication that results from having sex when you are not adequately aroused, however, may lead to painful vaginal tissue after sex, according to Dr. Christine Greves, an ob-gyn at the Winnie Palmer Hospital for Women and Babies in Los Angeles.

 

 

How to make yourself feel better right now: Dr. Greves advises administering a cold compress to the affected region as a follow-up measure. According to her, “Ice should not be applied straight to your vulva.” To alleviate the discomfort and potential swelling, wrap some ice in a clean towel and either sit on it or lay it on the affected region (over your underwear) for about 10 minutes to help reduce the inflammation. Another suggestion is to give your vagina a rest until it feels better, which means you shouldn’t have intercourse until the pain diminishes.

 

 

Preventing discomfort in the future is as simple as foreplay, foreplay, and more foreplay! To put it another way, Dr. Minkin says that arousal is just as “important” to having excellent sex for someone who has a vaginal organ as an erection is for someone who has a penis. Communicate with your spouse and show them what you enjoy in the pregame department to see if you can get along. Another situation when using lubricant may be beneficial, according to Dr. Greves, is if you’re interested in having sexual relations but don’t feel quite as enthused as you’d want to be.

 

 

The person you’re with, as well as the sex toy you’re using, are both very well-endowed.
Dr. Abdur-Rahman adds that if your partner’s penis, their hand, or the dildo they’re using is very large, it’s possible that it’s really touching your cervix during penetration. That, needless to say, does not make me feel well. Doctor Abdur Rahman believes that this discomfort may be similar to menstruation cramps in certain people.

 

 

How to make yourself feel better right now: Dr. Abdur-Rahman recommends taking a warm bath, using a heating pad, or taking a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication (NSAID) such as ibuprofen to relieve the pain. All of these items have anti-inflammatory properties that may help to alleviate some of the discomfort. In addition to that, just allow it some time to work. It shouldn’t take long for the pain to diminish, and if it doesn’t, you should consult with your physician.

 

 

Once again, preparation is essential in order to avoid future discomfort. As explained by Dr. Abdur-Rahman, the vagina expands (becomes bigger, longer, and broader) during foreplay, allowing for more comfortable penetration and deeper penetration in general. As a bonus, foreplay improves lubrication, which makes penetration a bit more straightforward. 

 

Adding lubricant as required will also be beneficial, as previously said.

From there, you should think carefully about where you want to go. According to Dr. Abdur-Rahman, any posture that puts the individual with a vagina in control of the penetration is a safe bet to avoid penetration. You think you’re on top of things. Prevent yourself from putting yourself in postures that increase penetration, such as doggy style or anything that includes the vaginal owner’s legs in the air. Those postures are more likely to cause a painful vaginal area to develop.

 

 

Last but not least, take your time. Slow down and be patient with yourself, and communicate with your spouse if you are experiencing any pain. And if you’re using a dildo, you may want to consider going down a size.

 

 

4. You had rough sex, which created a lot of friction in your body.

Friction may be very beneficial! It happens a lot! However, excessive friction may certainly cause your vagina to ache after sex, most often as a result of a lack of lubrication during the session.

 

How to make yourself feel better right now: According to Dr. Abdur-Rahman, applying a cold compress to the outside of your underwear for 10 to 15 minutes may relieve severe pain and swelling in your vulva (the entrance to your vagina). Don’t put the ice directly into your vaginal area; this will just aggravate the irritation. Continue to wait and see your doctor if you are still experiencing pain in your vaginal area after a few days.

The best way to avoid future discomfort is to take whatever measures you can to guarantee sufficient lubrication. A good method to give the vagina time to warm up is via foreplay. Lube is also beneficial. 

 

At the very least, it’s essential to take your time while you’re starting off. Start out softly and slowly, and then go to rougher, quicker sex (if that’s what you’re into) as your comfort level increases.

 

 

5) You have an allergy to latex, lubricant, or sperm.

Some individuals are allergic (or sensitive) to latex, while others are not. For those who fall into this category, wearing latex condoms may result in irritation of the vaginal mucous membranes. Miriam Greene, M.D.7, an obstetrician-gynecologist at NYU Langone Health, speaks with SELF.

 

There is also the possibility that you will be allergic or sensitive to the chemicals in your lube8 as well as to proteins found in your partner’s semen. According to the Mayo Clinic9, this may result in redness, burning, and swelling in the area where the injury occurred.

Hives, itching, and difficulty breathing are all possible symptoms of a severe allergic reaction to sperm. However, it is essential to note that this is a very uncommon occurrence. 

 

“A sensitivity to sperm is very seldom the problem,” Dr. Minkin emphasizes. That has happened to me a few times in my career, but it’s not common.”

How to feel better right now: If you are experiencing a response around the vulva, putting an ice pack outside your underwear to calm the region for 10 to 15 minutes is your best option, as is allowing it time to subside completely. However, if you suffer any of the more serious symptoms listed above, it’s important to visit a doctor as soon as possible to obtain a proper diagnosis and begin treatment as soon as possible.

How to avoid suffering in the future is as follows: 

 

Seek medical advice from your gynecologist to confirm your suspicions that you are allergic or sensitive to latex (and to rule out the possibility that you are experiencing anything different). If this is the case, you should avoid latex condoms in the future. That does not rule out the use of condoms entirely; there are a variety of options, such as polyurethane condoms, that may be used to prevent illness and pregnancy while also maintaining your sexual health.

 

 

 

Just a quick note: Although polyurethane condoms are nonlatex and may help prevent illness and pregnancy, they have greater slippage and breakage rates than latex condoms, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention10 (CDC). It is also latex-free, although it is only marginally less efficient at preventing pregnancy than latex condoms in terms of preventing pregnancy.

 

 You may collaborate with your gynecologist to create a solution that is comfortable for both you and your significant other.

If you suspect that the chemicals in your lubricant are to fault, Dr. Minkin suggests consulting with an allergist about having allergy testing to confirm your suspicion


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You’re suffering from a vaginal infection.

 

If you’re experiencing discomfort that extends beyond mild soreness, such as itching, burning, abnormal discharge, or pelvic pain, you may be suffering from a vaginal infection, according to the American Academy of Dermatology. You should consult with your gynecologist since it is possible that you have a yeast infection or bacterial vaginosis or a STI, or that you have something completely different.

 

 

Dr. Abdur-Rahman advises that you should not self-diagnose or self-treat your symptoms but rather see your doctor. Depending on the severity of the illness, you may need prescription medicine. In other words, the sooner you can get into your gynecologist’s office (even if it’s just virtual), the better.

 

 

The best way to avoid discomfort in the future: Preventive measures will differ greatly depending on the kind of infection you have, and you should see your gynecologist for specific guidance on what actions you should take in the future. Having saying that, there are a few excellent rules of thumb to follow. Using a condom or dental dam is recommended if the kind of sexual encounter you’re having requires it. As you are well aware, this kind of barrier protection may aid in the prevention of sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

 

 

 A second piece of advice: pee after sex to reduce your chances of developing a UTI. Last but not least, refrain from douching. According to Dr. Abdur-Rahman, douching may cause a disruption in the pH balance of your vaginal fluid, making you more vulnerable to infection. And if your vagina is very painful, you may want to try placing a cool washcloth on it for a few minutes to see if it helps.

 

 

You are suffering from a medical ailment.
If you have discomfort often during or after sex, you may have a medical condition that causes pain during or after sex, such as the following:

 

Endometriosis is a condition in which the lining of your uterus develops outside of your uterus rather than within it, as opposed to the other way around. Most of the time, it will develop on your ovaries, fallopian tubes, and the tissue lining your pelvic cavity (in rare cases, it can spread beyond the pelvic area to your abdomen or lungs) 11.

These are benign (non malignant) growths that form inside and on the uterus12.

The condition known as vulvodynia is characterized by persistent vaginal discomfort that does not have a known etiology and lasts for at least three months13. Vulvodynia is a very prevalent condition, despite the fact that many individuals are unaware of it. Burning, stinging, rawness, and painful sex are some of the other symptoms that may accompany a sore vagina. The discomfort may be continuous or intermittent, and you may only feel it when the affected region is touched, such as after intercourse.

Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) occurs when germs from your vagina travel to your other reproductive organs (such as your uterus, fallopian tubes, or ovaries) and cause an infection14.

 

 

Vaginismus is a condition in which your vaginal muscles tighten or spasm unintentionally, making penetration (whether from your spouse or a tampon) painful. Experts aren’t sure what causes vaginismus, although mental problems, previous operations, birthing injuries, or a dread of sex as a result of sexual abuse or trauma in the past have all been linked to the condition.

 

 

Coccidiosis is a medical disease that occurs when the cervix, which is located at the bottom, narrow end of your uterus and opens into your vagina, gets inflamed16.

Ovarian cysts: These common fluid-filled sacs that form in or on the ovary are called ovarian cysts. Most cysts are harmless and will go away on their own, but bigger cysts may cause bloating, a sensation of fullness in your belly, and pelvic discomfort if left untreated. It is essential to contact a doctor if you have sudden, acute abdominal or pelvic pain17, since ruptured cysts may lead to serious consequences.

 

 

 

Besides retroverted uterus, cystitis (typically a UTI), irritable bowel syndrome, and hemorrhoids, the Mayo Clinic also recommends that you see your doctor if you are experiencing painful sex.

 

How to make yourself feel better right now: Make an appointment with your gynecologist, who will usually do a physical exam as well as an ultrasound to check for any abnormalities in your pregnancy.

 

 

 

How to avoid discomfort in the future: Discuss your symptoms with your gynecologist and ask for their recommendations on the best approach to reduce pain during sexual activity in the future. Some positions may be more pleasant than others depending on your health, and your care provider may assist you in determining which positions are most comfortable for you.

 

 

 

8. It is possible that low estrogen is to blame.

According to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG18), estrogen is a hormone that helps maintain the lubrication, suppleness, and thickness of your vagina. Dr. Minkin explains that when estrogen levels in the body are low, you may suffer thinning, dryness, and inflammation of your vaginal walls, which can result in a painful vagina. That’s particularly true if you’re going through menopause, nursing, have just given birth, or are on anti-estrogen medications like clomid.

 

 

 

How to make yourself feel better right now: If you have dry skin down there, Dr. Minkin recommends using a long-lasting moisturizer like Replens  two to three times a week. This is not the same as a lubricant in the traditional sense: When you use a vaginal moisturizer, it works particularly by coating the interior of your vagina with moisture, which remains there for many days, allowing the vaginal tissue to grow healthier over time. Lubricants, on the other hand, only briefly improve the slickness of a surface. Even after using a vaginal moisturizer for two weeks, if any pain continues, see your doctor about alternative treatment options.

 

 

 

How to avoid discomfort in the future: In many of these instances, it is not possible to prevent low estrogen levels from occurring. According to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, if you’re going through menopause (or have already gone through it), your doctor may recommend estrogen creams and tablets that you can insert into the vagina or using a vaginal ring, which releases a low dose of estrogen over a 90-day period. If you’re taking anti-estrogen medicine for cancer or are nursing, talk to your doctor about your treatment choices to ensure your health and safety.

 

 

9. You have scar tissue on your body.

In the event that you have just given birth or had surgery down there, such as the removal of a potentially dangerous lesion, scar tissue may be “a possibility,” according to Dr. Minkin, for a painful vagina after sex. Scratching your skin after a cut, sore, burn, or other skin problem may result in the formation of scar tissue, as can having an incision put into your skin during surgery20. Dr. Minkin adds that if you have a cut, rip, or wound in your vaginal area that “didn’t heal correctly,” it may result in discomfort.

 

 

 

How to make yourself feel better right now: The most appropriate therapy for you will be determined by the amount of your scar tissue. Dr. Greves adds that if you don’t have a lot of scar tissue, you may discover that using lubrication during intercourse may assist to alleviate the discomfort you’re experiencing. It is, however, recommended that you speak with your doctor if this does not alleviate your symptoms. Dr. Greves explains that they will want to do a physical exam and then suggest next measures, which may include visiting a physical therapist who specializes in pelvic problems.

 

 

Because scar tissue that develops in your vagina cannot be readily treated with a lotion or ointment, preventing discomfort in the future may be difficult to achieve. How to avoid pain in the future: But if you’re expecting a vaginal birth or if you’re having a vaginal operation done, speak to your doctor about the possibility of scar tissue and what you may do to reduce the likelihood of it.


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