STDs

STDs

STDs

Sickness and disease (STDs) are diseases that are transmitted from one person to another, typically via sexual contact such as vaginal, anal, and oral sex.

 

 They’re very prevalent, and many of the individuals who have them don’t show any signs of illness. In the absence of treatment, sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) may result in severe health issues. It is important to note, however, that being tested is not a huge issue, and that the majority of STDs are easily treatable.

 

Chlamydia

What exactly is Chlamydia?
Chlamydia is a bacterial infection that may be treated well with antibiotic medication. It’s one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), and most individuals who have chlamydia don’t exhibit any signs or symptoms.

 

Chlamydia is a very frequent infection.
Chlamydia is a bacterial illness that may be acquired via sexual intercourse with another person. It is very prevalent. Every year, it affects about 3 million people in the United States, with the majority of cases occurring among those aged 14 to 24.

 

Chlamydia is transmitted via sexual contact, including vaginal, anal, and oral intercourse. The infection is spread via the transmission of sperm (cum), pre-cum, and vaginal secretions. Chlamydia is a bacteria that may infect the penis, vagina, cervix, anus, urethra, eyes, and throat, among other places. Most individuals who have chlamydia don’t have any symptoms and seem to be completely healthy, making it possible that they are unaware that they are infected.

 

 

Antibiotics are a simple and effective way to treat Chlamydia. However, if you do not treat chlamydia immediately, it may result in serious health issues in the future. That’s why STD testing is so essential – the sooner you find out you have chlamydia, the sooner you can have it treated and get back on your feet. By wearing condoms every time you have sex, you may avoid contracting chlamydia.

 

 

What is the most common way to acquire chlamydia?

When you have sexual contact with someone who has the illness, you are more likely to acquire chlamydia. It is possible even if no one takes action. The most common methods for individuals to acquire chlamydia are via vaginal intercourse and anal sex, but it may also be transmitted through oral sex.

 

 

If you have contaminated secretions on your hand and you contact your eye, you may acquire chlamydia. This is very rare. If the mother is infected with chlamydia, the virus may be passed to the baby during delivery.

Similarly, since chlamydia is not transmitted via casual touch, you cannot get chlamydia by sharing food or beverages, kissing or embracing another person or holding hands with them, coughing or sneezing, or sitting on the toilet.

The most effective method of preventing chlamydia is to use condoms and/or dental dams every time you have sexual contact.

 

Symptoms of Chlamydia
Because most individuals with chlamydia do not exhibit any symptoms, the majority of the population is unaware that they have the disease. If you suspect you may have chlamydia, you should be tested. Here’s what you should be looking for.

Chlamydia is a sexually transmitted infection that typically causes no symptoms.

 

Chlamydia may be difficult to detect since it usually manifests itself in the absence of visible or palpable symptoms. Sometimes the signs and symptoms of chlamydia are so minor that individuals may not notice them, or they misinterpret the symptoms as being caused by another illness. The majority of the time, individuals are completely unaware that they have chlamydia — which is one of the reasons it is such a prevalent illness (and one of the reasons it is so essential to be tested).

 

 

If you don’t cure chlamydia, it may cause severe infections and even infertility if left untreated. However, if you detect it early enough, it is generally treatable with medication and may be avoided altogether. As a result, frequent STD testing is very essential, regardless of how healthy you seem to be.

Signs and symptoms of chlamydia

 

If you do have chlamydia symptoms, it may take many weeks for them to manifest themselves after contracting the infection. Chlamydia symptoms may manifest themselves in both men and women, and include the following:

While peeing, you may experience discomfort or burning.

sex-related discomfort

stomach discomfort in the lower abdomen

vaginal discharge that is out of the ordinary (may be yellowish and have a strong smell)

bleeding between menstrual cycles

The discharge from the penis may be pus or watery/milky in consistency.

testicles that be enlarged or painful

Anus discomfort, discharge, and/or bleeding are all possible symptoms.

Itching and discharge are common symptoms of chlamydia infection in the eyes. You may also have redness, skin discoloration around your eyes, itching, and discharge. Chlamydia infections in the throat may sometimes produce discomfort, although this is very uncommon.

 

 

Please get medical attention if you or your partner exhibits any of these symptoms. You may also visit your local Planned Parenthood Health Center. If you’re expecting a child, it’s particularly essential to be checked out.

Remember that the majority of individuals who have chlamydia do not exhibit any symptoms at all. That’s why being tested is the only way to find out for certain whether you have chlamydia.

Is it necessary for me to be tested for chlamydia?

The only way to find out whether you have chlamydia is to be tested for it. People who engage in sexual activity should get their sexuality checked on a regular basis. Chlamydia testing are often fast, painless, and, in some cases, completely free.

 

What is the best way to tell whether I have chlamydia?
There is no way to determine whether you have chlamydia simply by looking at your symptoms. Tests are the only method to determine whether or not you have chlamydia, regardless of whether or not you are experiencing symptoms.

 

In the event that you are exhibiting symptoms of chlamydia, you should get tested. Tests are also recommended if you’ve had unprotected sex or if you suspect that a partner has chlamydia (even if you don’t notice any symptoms). In general, individuals who are sexually active should be tested for STDs, including chlamydia, approximately once a year. If you’re expecting a child, get your chlamydia test done during your first prenatal appointment. Interested in learning whether you should be tested for chlamydia? Check out this quiz to find out more about it.

 

Chlamydia testing is a simple and painless procedure. What is the most enjoyable aspect of being tested for STDs? Once you’ve completed the task, it may truly help to set your mind at rest. In addition, if you are infected with chlamydia, it is important to find out as soon as possible so that you may begin treatment and get well as soon as possible.

 

What occurs during a chlamydia test is not well understood.
Chlamydia testing may be as easy as urinating in a cup to diagnose the infection. When you are tested, a cotton swab may be used to gently touch the inside of your genitals in order to get cell samples from your urethra, vaginal canal, cervix, or anus. The samples are analyzed for the presence of the chlamydia bacterium. The presence of chlamydia symptoms, such as discharge from the cervix, may also be seen during an examination by your doctor.

 

 

Chlamydia may be mistaken for other common STDs such as gonorrhea, therefore your nurse or doctor may do a number of tests to rule out other diseases.

Although the prospect of being tested may be frightening, try not to get too concerned. STD testing is a routine aspect of being a responsible person and caring for one’s own health and wellbeing. The good news is that chlamydia is completely treatable with medicine, so the sooner you recognize that you have it, the sooner you may get rid of it completely.

 

 

What is the best place to be tested for chlamydia?
Your doctor’s office, a community health clinic, the health department, or a Planned Parenthood health center are all good places to be tested for chlamydia and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). In certain areas, you may complete an online visit and a chlamydia test from the comfort of your own home.

STD testing is not usually included in your routine checkup or gynecological visit; you must request it if you want it. Communicate openly and honestly with your nurse or doctor so that they can assist you in determining which tests you may need. Never be ashamed since your doctor is there to assist you, not to criticize you.

What is HIV & AIDS?

HIV is the virus that causes AIDS.

 It weakens your immune system, making things easier for you to get ill. HIV is transmitted via sexual contact, although condoms may help protect you.

HIV is an infection that may result in the development of AIDS.
HIV is an abbreviation for Human Immunodeficiency Virus. It is caused by a virus that attacks and destroys specific cells in your immune system (your body’s natural defense against illness that keeps you healthy). When HIV weakens your immune system, it becomes easier to get very ill and even die from illnesses that your body would usually be able to fight off.

In the United States, about 1.1 million individuals are living with HIV, with more than 38,000 new infections occurring every year. The majority of HIV-positive individuals may not experience any symptoms for many years and seem to be completely healthy, making it possible that they are unaware that they carry the virus.

Once you acquire HIV, the virus remains in your body for the rest of your life. Although there is currently no cure for HIV, medications may help you maintain your health. HIV medication reduces, if not eliminates, your risk of transmitting the infection to other individuals. Studies have shown that taking HIV medication as prescribed may reduce the quantity of HIV in your blood to such a low level that it may not even show up on a test – when this occurs, you are unable to transfer HIV via intercourse.

 

 

 

Treatment is very essential (which is why being tested is so vital). HIV may progress to AIDS if not treated. People living with HIV, however, may live long and healthy lives while also preventing the transmission of HIV to others via the use of medication.

What is the difference between HIV and AIDS?
HIV is the virus that causes AIDS. AIDS is an abbreviation for Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome. HIV and AIDS are not the same thing. Furthermore, not all HIV-positive individuals develop AIDS.

HIV is the virus that is transmitted from person to person. Over time, HIV kills an essential kind of immune cell in your body (known as CD4 cells or T cells) that helps protect you against infections. When you don’t have enough of these CD4 cells, your body is unable to fight illnesses the way it should.

AIDS is a disease that develops as a result of the harm that HIV causes to your immune system. When you acquire a serious infection or have a low CD4 cell count, you are diagnosed with AIDS. AIDS is the most severe stage of HIV infection, and it eventually leads to death.

 

 

 

Without treatment, it takes about 10 years for someone who has HIV to acquire AIDS. Treatment may help individuals remain healthy for many decades by slowing the harm that the virus causes.

 

 

What is the method of transmission of HIV?
HIV may be found in sperm (cum), vaginal fluids, anal mucus, blood, and breast milk. The virus enters your body via wounds or sores in your skin, as well as through your mucous membranes (like the inside of the vagina, rectum, and opening of the penis). HIV may be acquired through the following sources:

having vaginal or anal sex

 

 

Sharing needles or syringes for the purpose of injecting narcotics, getting piercings or tattoos, and so on

being jabbed with a needle that contains HIV-infected blood on it

putting HIV-infected blood, semen (cum), or vaginal fluids into open wounds or sores on your body

HIV is often transmitted via unprotected intercourse. Using condoms and/or dental dams every time you have sex, as well as not sharing needles, may help protect you and your partners against HIV. If you have HIV, therapy may reduce or even eliminate the risk of transmitting the infection to other individuals through sexual contact. If you don’t have HIV, you may take a daily medication known as PrEP, which can help prevent you from contracting the virus.

 

 

HIV may potentially be transmitted to infants during pregnancy, childbirth, or nursing. A pregnant woman who has HIV may take medication to significantly decrease the likelihood that her unborn child will acquire HIV.

Because HIV cannot be transmitted via saliva (spit), you CANNOT acquire HIV by kissing, sharing food or beverages, or using the same fork or spoon. HIV is also not transmitted via physical contact such as hugging, holding hands, coughing, or sneezing. Additionally, you cannot acquire HIV via a toilet seat.

 

 

A long time ago, several individuals contracted HIV after receiving contaminated blood transfusions. However, donating or receiving blood in medical facilities is now completely safe. Doctors, hospitals, and blood donation facilities do not use needles more than once, and donated blood is screened for HIV and other diseases.

What are the symptoms of HIV & AIDS?

People who have HIV don’t typically show any signs or symptoms immediately away, so they may be unaware that they have the virus. It may take years before HIV manifests itself as illness.

 

 

Symptoms of HIV infection in the early stages
People who have been infected with HIV often seem and feel completely healthy for a lengthy period of time. It may take up to ten years or more for HIV to manifest itself in any way — and much longer for individuals who are on HIV medications — before any symptoms appear. Because of this, being tested for HIV on a regular basis is very essential, particularly if you’ve had unprotected sex or used shared needles. HIV therapy may assist you in maintaining your health. Treatment may also reduce, if not completely eliminate, your risk of transmitting HIV to other individuals through intercourse.

 

 

 

You may have fever, aches, and sickness within the first 2-4 weeks after being infected with HIV. The flu-like symptoms you’re experiencing are your body’s initial response to HIV infection. Because there is a large amount of the virus in your system at this period, it is very simple to transmit HIV to other individuals. The symptoms endure just a few weeks, and after that, you are unlikely to experience them again for many years. However, HIV may be transmitted to other individuals regardless of whether or not you are experiencing symptoms or feeling ill.

 

 

Symptoms of HIV/AIDS later in life
HIV kills immune system cells known as CD4 cells or T cells, which are found in the bloodstream. Your body has a difficult time combating illnesses if you don’t have enough CD4 cells. You are more prone to get very ill as a result of illnesses that would normally not be harmful to you. AIDS develops as a result of the harm HIV causes to your immune system over time.

 

 

You have AIDS if you get a rare illness (known as an opportunistic infection) or a certain kind of malignancy, or if you have a particular amount of CD4 cells in your body. If you don’t receive therapy for HIV, this typically occurs around 10 years after you acquire the virus. Treatment may be able to postpone or even prevent the development of AIDS in the future.

 

 

Among the indications and symptoms of AIDS are:

Thrush is a bird of prey that may be found in the woodlands of the United States (a thick, white coating on your tongue or mouth)

Throat discomfort

Yeast infections that are very bad

Chronic pelvic inflammatory disease is a medical condition that affects the pelvis.

Getting sick with severe illnesses on a regular basis

I’m feeling very fatigued, disoriented, and lightheaded.

Headaches

Getting rid of a lot of weight fast

Bruising occurs more often than usual.

For a prolonged period of time, you may have diarrhea, fever, or night sweats.

glands in your neck, armpit, or groin that are swollen or hard

Coughing fits that are long and dry

You’re feeling out of breath.

Growths on your skin or within your mouth that are purplish in color

Bleeding from the mouth, nose, anus, or vagina is a medical emergency.

Rashes on the skin

The sensation of being completely numb in your hands or feet, losing control of your muscles and reflexes, being unable to move, and losing strength in your muscles are all symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome.

Should I get tested for HIV?

To find out whether you have HIV, you must undergo a testing procedure. All people should be tested for HIV if they are at risk. HIV testing are fast, painless, and, in certain cases, even free of charge.

 

What is the best way to tell whether I have HIV?
The only way to know for certain whether or not you have HIV is to be tested for it. There’s no way to determine whether you have HIV simply by how you feel since most individuals who acquire HIV don’t show any signs or symptoms for many years.

In the event that you have had unprotected intercourse or that your partner has tested positive for HIV, you should consider having your blood tested. You should also be tested if you’ve had any contact with someone who has used your needles (for shooting drugs, piercings, or tattoos). If you’re expecting a child, you should get your HIV tested at your first prenatal appointment.

 

 

Fortunately, HIV testing is a simple and painless procedure. What is the most enjoyable aspect of being tested for HIV? Once you’ve completed the task, it may truly help to set your mind at rest. And if you do have HIV, it’s better to find out as soon as possible so that you can start taking medications to help you remain healthy and reduce your risks of transmitting the virus to others.

 

 

What is the procedure for doing HIV tests?
When you acquire HIV, your immune system responds by producing antibodies that attempt to combat the virus. This kind of HIV test searches for these antibodies in your blood or cells taken from your cheek in the most usual way.

A typical time frame for your body to produce enough antibodies to be detected by an HIV test is 3 months, but it may take as long as 6 months or even longer. The “window period” refers to the period of time between when you first get infected and when you will not test positive for HIV. If you are tested during this period, you may get a negative result even if you are in fact infected with the virus. It is also during this time period that you have the greatest risk of transmitting HIV to other individuals.

 

 

What kind of HIV testing are available?
Rapid HIV testing may provide findings in as little as 20 minutes. Other tests take longer to complete because they must be submitted to a laboratory. HIV tests are generally painless; you just touch the inside of your cheek with a soft swab to see whether you have the virus. You may be asked to provide a blood sample for testing at times.

Using an at-home HIV testing kit, you can determine whether or not you have HIV. In order to use the OraQuick In-Home HIV Test, you must swab your gums and perform the test yourself. You may see results in as little as 20 minutes. In order to get a tiny quantity of blood for the Home Access HIV-1 Test, you must prick your finger. 

 

You send your blood sample to a lab, and you should get your findings within a week or so. The findings of at-home tests are completely confidential — you are the only one who will be aware of them. Additionally, both kinds of testing assist you in connecting with counselors who can provide you with support and treatment recommendations if you test positive.

 

 

Obtain a follow-up test to ensure that the findings of an HIV fast test at a clinic or a home test were accurate if you are found to be infected with HIV.

 

Where can I go to be tested for HIV?
A variety of locations include your doctor’s office, a community health clinic, the local health department, and your local Planned Parenthood health center provide HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases (STD) testing. You may want to consider getting your HIV test done in a facility that also provides HIV counseling (like Planned Parenthood).

Depending on the regulations in the state where you reside, you may be able to get a “anonymous” or “confidential” HIV test. 

 

 

Testing that is designated as “confidential” implies that your name will be on the test and the findings will be included into your medical records. Your physicians and insurance company may be able to see the findings as well as you. If you test positive for HIV, your findings are sent to your local health department so that they can learn about the prevalence of the virus in your region. However, because of privacy regulations, no one else will be able to view your findings unless you give them permission to do so.

 

 

“Anonymous” testing refers to the fact that your name is not included on the exam. You’ll be given an ID number, which you’ll need to enter in order to find out your findings. Because your test findings will not be entered into your medical records, and they will not be sent to your insurance company or the health department, you will be the only one who will be aware of them.

 

 

STD testing, including HIV testing, is not typically included in your routine checkup or gynecological visit; instead, you must request it separately from your regular examination. Communicate openly with your nurse or doctor so that they can assist you in determining which tests are most appropriate for you. Keep your dignity: your doctor is there to assist you, not to criticize your situation. (And if your doctor does criticize you for requesting an HIV test, it may be time to find a new doctor.)

 

 

Although the prospect of being tested may be frightening, try not to get too concerned. STD testing is an important aspect of being a responsible adult and caring for one’s health. HIV testing are fast and painless in the majority of cases. And, if you do have HIV, it’s best to find out as soon as possible so that you may begin treatment as soon as feasible.

HIV treatment

However, therapy may help you remain healthy even if there is no cure for HIV. It may also reduce, if not completely eliminate, your risk of transmitting HIV to others.

Which medications are used to treat HIV?

 

However, although there is currently no cure for HIV, medication options exist that may help individuals with HIV live longer, healthier lives. In HIV treatment, antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a combination of medications that slows down the effects of the virus in your body and may help you remain healthy for many years after treatment is completed. It may also reduce, if not completely eliminate, your risk of transmitting HIV to others.

ART reduces the quantity of HIV in your body (also known as your viral load) — sometimes to the point where HIV is no longer detectable by conventional blood tests (also known as viral suppression). “Undetectable” is the term used to describe an HIV viral load that is so low that it cannot be detected by certain testing. It is impossible to transmit HIV to others during intercourse when one has an undetectable viral load.

 

 

It’s essential to note that even if your viral load is undetectable, HIV may still be found in your system. Your viral load may increase if you discontinue treatment, making it potential for HIV to be passed onto people with whom you have sexual contact. Depending on your situation, your doctor or nurse may assist you in determining the best therapy to use to keep your viral load low and your health intact.

 

 

Paying attention to your way of living may also assist you in maintaining your health. In order to achieve this goal, you must eat properly, get enough sleep, exercise, learn how to cope with stress, and abstain from the use of alcohol, tobacco, and narcotics.

 

 

May you tell me where I can go to receive HIV treatment?

When looking for a doctor, be sure that he or she has previous expertise with HIV treatment. If you are in need of medical care, your local Planned Parenthood clinic may assist you. Also available on the website is a search engine that may help you locate an HIV doctor and other support resources in your local region.

How can I prevent HIV?

HIV is transmitted via the reproductive system, including sperm, vaginal fluids, blood, and breast milk, among other routes. Use condoms every time you have sex and don’t share needles with anybody to keep yourself and others safe. A daily medication that helps prevent HIV infection may also be discussed with your doctor.

 

 

What can I do to prevent contracting HIV when having sex with another person?
A person contracts HIV by coming into touch with blood or sexual fluids (such as sperm or vaginal fluid), which typically happens during vaginal or anal intercourse. As a result, the only method to prevent contracting HIV is to refrain from having vaginal or anal intercourse at all.

 

 

However, because almost everyone has sex at some time in their life, understanding about HIV prevention and how to have safer sex is essential. In fact, using condoms significantly reduces your chances of contracting HIV. The most effective method to protect oneself against HIV infection is to use condoms at all times while having sex. A daily medication, known as PrEP, that you may take can also help prevent HIV infection. Whether you want to know if PrEP is right for you, talk to your doctor or nurse first.

With regard to the risk of contracting HIV, some sexual practices are more risk-free than others. In fact, there has never been a recorded instance of HIV associated with any of the following activities:

 

masturbating

genital contact with your partner

making contact with each other’s bodies (dry humping)

kissing

Having oral intercourse using a condom or dental dam is considered sexual misconduct.

utilizing clean sex toys as a means of communication

There have only been a few documented cases of HIV from these activities (out of millions) indicating that they are “lower risk.”

If you are kissing someone “French” or deeply, you are doing something wrong (if the person with HIV has sores or bleeding in their mouth)

The use of a condom and/or pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is recommended for vaginal intercourse.

using a condom and/or pre-eclampsia (PREP) during anal intercourse

No condom or dental dam is used during oral sex.

All of the following activities are considered “high risk,” and millions of individuals acquire HIV as a result of them:

The practice of having vaginal intercourse without using a condom or Preventative Treatment and Evaluation for Pregnancy (PrEP).

the practice of having anal intercourse without the use of a condom or preventative sterilization

If you have sores, wounds, or holes in your skin through which sperm (cum), vaginal fluids, or blood may enter, it is simpler for HIV to infiltrate your system. If you have a herpes outbreak or any other diseases, avoid having sexual relations. Other STDs increase your risk of contracting HIV, therefore being checked for STDs on a regular basis is a wise decision.

There is now no HIV vaccine available, but a large number of researchers are trying to develop one in the future. Also available are HIV-prevention medications (referred to as PEP and PrEP).

Antiretroviral therapy (ART) may be used to treat HIV in those who do not have the virus but have a spouse who does (ART). The use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) may reduce the likelihood of HIV transmission during intercourse. As a side note, some individuals who are on antiretroviral therapy (ART) are completely incapable of transmitting HIV to their partner.

In what ways does PrEP work to reduce HIV transmission?
Pre-exposure prophylaxis (also known as PrEP) is a method of preventing HIV infection before it is exposed to it. Once a day use of this tablet may aid in the prevention of HIV transmission. In order to determine whether or not PrEP is right for you, consult with your doctor or nurse. PrEP is a topic that deserves more attention than it currently receives.

 

 

In what ways does PEP help to reduce HIV transmission?
Post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) is an abbreviation for the term. You begin taking it after you’ve been exposed to HIV, and it works by decreasing your chances of contracting the virus. This medication only works if you begin taking it within 72 hours (3 days) after being exposed to HIV. Getting started as soon as possible is crucial. You only have one hour to act, so contact your nurse or doctor or go to the nearest emergency hospital as soon as you suspect you have been exposed to the virus. When used in an emergency, PEP is not a substitute for condoms or pre-exposure prophylaxis (pre-exposure prevention) PEP is explained in more detail here.

In what ways does anti-retroviral therapy (ART) aid in the prevention of HIV infection?
In HIV treatment, antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a combination of medications that slows down the effects of the virus in your body and may help you remain healthy for many years after treatment is completed. It may also reduce, if not completely eliminate, your risk of transmitting HIV to others.

 

 

 

ART reduces the quantity of HIV in your body (also known as your viral load) — sometimes to the point where HIV is no longer detectable by conventional blood tests (also known as viral suppression). “Undetectable” is the term used to describe an HIV viral load that is so low that it cannot be detected by certain testing. It is impossible to transmit HIV to others during intercourse when one has an undetectable viral load.

It’s essential to note that even if your viral load is undetectable, HIV may still be found in your system. Your viral load may increase if you discontinue treatment, making it potential for HIV to be passed onto people with whom you have sexual contact. Depending on your situation, your doctor or nurse may assist you in determining the best therapy to use to keep your viral load low and your health intact.

What precautions should I take to ensure that I do not infect anybody with HIV when having sexual relations?

 

 

Attempt to maintain your composure if you are diagnosed with HIV. Having normal, healthy relationships and a sexual life while living with HIV is possible. To assist your partner(s) remain HIV-free, it’s critical to take the necessary measures.

A few precautions may be taken to prevent spreading HIV to other individuals. These include:

When you have vaginal and anal intercourse, always wear condoms to protect yourself.

Get on an HIV treatment program right away, and don’t stop taking your HIV medication. It is possible to reduce or even eliminate the risk of transmitting HIV to sexual partners if HIV therapy is administered properly (and help you stay healthy).

Your companion may take a daily medication called PrEP to reduce their chances of contracting HIV.

 

 

 

Needles for injecting narcotics, piercings, and tattoos should not be shared.

Maintain a regular schedule of testing and treatment for STDs other than HIV. You are more likely to transfer HIV if you have other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs).

If you are found to be HIV positive, it is critical that you inform your sexual partners so that they may be tested as a precaution. Even if you take great precautions to avoid spreading HIV, it’s important to be upfront with prospective partners about your HIV status so that you can both remain informed and support one another in staying healthy in the long run. Please see this article for additional information on how to speak about HIV with your partner.